The PRICED Act Would Expedite Biosimilar Market Entry

Although the 12-year exclusivity period for original biologic products was a heavily negotiated provision of the Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act (BPCIA), increased spending on biologic drugs has led to calls to shorten that exclusivity period to expedite biosimilar market entry. Most recently, on June 23, 2016, Illinois Congresswoman Jan Schakowsky and Senators John McCain (R-AZ) and Sherrod Brown (D-OH) introduced the “Price Relief, Innovation, and Competition for Essential Drugs” (PRICED) Act in the U.S. House of Representatives and Senate. The bills would amend the “first licensure” provisions of the BPCIA to shorten the market exclusivity period for new biologics from 12 to 7 years. Similarly, the President’s budget for fiscal year 2017 recommended “prohibiting additional periods of exclusivity for brand biologics due to minor changes in product formulations.”

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New USPTO P3 Program Offers Applicant Participation In After Final Conference

The USPTO has launched a new after final program available starting today, July 11, 2016. The Post-Prosecution Pilot Program (P3) combines features of the After Final Consideration Pilot 2.0 (AFCP 2.0) and Pre-Appeal Brief Conference Pilot programs, and adds a feature that stakeholders have been clamoring for–Applicant participation in the process. The P3 program will run through January 12, 2017, or the date the USPTO has accepted 1,600 compliant requests. However, each individual technology center will accept only 200 compliant requests, so the program could close earlier in a given technology center. Continue reading this entry

CAFC Finds Cryopreservation Method Patent Eligible

The Federal Circuit ruled that the cryopreservation methods at issue in Rapid Litigation Mgmt. Ltd. v. CellzDirect Inc., are patent eligible under 35 USC § 101. It therefore vacated and remanded the decision of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois that held the claims invalid on summary judgment. The Federal Circuit distinguished the claims at issue from other method claims invalidated under recent patent eligibility jurisprudence, and provided additional guidance on when methods that exploit a natural phenomenon are not “directed to” non-eligible subject matter. Continue reading this entry

Federal Circuit Requires 180 Day Notice For All Biosimilars, Even After Patent Dance

In Amgen v. Apotex, the Federal Circuit rejected Apotex’s arguments that the 180-day pre-marketing notice requirement does not apply to biosimilar applicants who participated in the “patent dance” process of the Biologics Price Competition and Innovation Act (“BPCIA”), expanding on its decision in Amgen v. Sandoz that 42 USC § 262(l)(8)(A) is a mandatory, stand-alone requirement. The Supreme Court has asked the Solicitor General to weigh in on whether it should grant certiorari in Amgen v. Sandoz. Will this decision make the Court more or less likely to review the Federal Circuit’s interpretation of this important biosimilar statute?  Continue reading this entry

Senate Judiciary Introduces CREATES Act To Expedite Access To Affordable Drugs

Following months of public outcry and Congressional probes into significant drug price increases, the Senate Judiciary Committee introduced legislation targeting “behavior that blocks competition and delays the creation of affordable generic drugs” and biosimilar products. The bill, entitled the Creating and Restoring Equal Access to Equivalent Samples (CREATES) Act of 2016, S. 3056, would punish the strategic refusal of “innovator” companies to (1) share drug samples needed for generic and biosimilar regulatory testing and approval; and (2) agree on a shared safety protocol for so-called “REMS products.” The CREATES Act is the latest in a string of legislative efforts around the country focusing on drug affordability and price transparency.

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