Category Archives: Obviousness Type Double Patenting

Subscribe to Obviousness Type Double Patenting RSS Feed

Judge Grants Gilead Motion To Invalidate Remicade Patent For Obviousness-Type Double Patenting

The FDA approved Inflectra–Celltrion’s biosimilar version of Janssen’s Remicade® (infliximab) product–in April 2016, but according to Pfizer’s press release it’s commercial launch still “depend[s] on a number of factors” including “intellectual property considerations.” The pending biosimilar patent litigation got one step closer to resolution last week when Judge Wolf of the U.S. District Court for the District of Massachusetts … Continue reading this entry

Patent Term Adjustment Versus Double Patenting

In Magna Electronics, Inc. v. TRW Automotive Holdings Corp., No. 1:12-cv-654; 1:13-cv-324 (Dec. 10, 2015), Judge Maloney of the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Michigan granted TRW’s motion for partial summary judgement of invalidity based on obviousness-type double patenting over a later-granted child patent. While it was only a matter of time before … Continue reading this entry

Federal Circuit Strikes Final Blow To Celebrex Patent

In 2008, the Federal Circuit determined that claims 1-4 and 11-17 of U.S. Patent No. 5,760,068 were invalid for obviousness-type double patenting (OTDP) over a related parent patent, in part because the ‘068 patent was filed as a continuation-in-part (CIP) application, not a divisional application. Now, in G.D. Searle LLC v. Lupin Pharmaceuticals Inc., the Federal Circuit … Continue reading this entry

A Second Look At The Innovation Act Obviousness Type Double Patenting Statute

When the Innovation Act first was introduced, I was skeptical of the proposed obviousness-type double patenting statute. I did not understand why some thought that patents that fall under the First-Inventor-To-File provisions of the American Invents Act would not be subject to the existing judicially-created doctrine of obviousness-type double patenting, and I thought that the … Continue reading this entry

Humira Patent Invalid For Obviousness Type Double Patenting

In AbbVie Inc. v. Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology Trust, the Federal Circuit affirmed the district court’s finding that a second patent covering  AbbVie’s Humira product is invalid under the doctrine of obviousness-type double patenting. The decision reaffirms the court’s stance in Gilead that the doctrine remains valid under the 20-year patent term system, and serves … Continue reading this entry

Federal Circuit Says Mistaken Belief Required For Reissue Error

In In re Dinsmore, the Federal Circuit held that the reissue process could not be used to correct an alleged defect in a terminal disclaimer between patents that were not commonly owned, because there had been no “mistaken belief” to support a reissue error within the meaning of the statute. This case underscores the limits … Continue reading this entry

Federal Circuit Expands Doctrine Of Obviousness Type Double Patenting

Can a later-granted patent render an earlier-granted patent invalid for obviousness-type double patenting? In Gilead Sciences, Inc. v. Natco Pharma Limited, the Federal Circuit held that it can. This decision could have far-reaching impact on the ability of patent owners to fully protect their inventions or enjoy the full benefit of patent term adjustment awards. … Continue reading this entry

Patent Term Adjustment And Double Patenting

The March 3, 2014 edition of BNA’s Patent, Trademark & Copyright Journal® — Daily Update included an interesting article by Qing (Becky) Lin about “Strategies for Minimizing Patent Term Loss Due to Double Patenting.” I agree with most of Ms. Lin’s suggestions, and wanted to point out a few creative ways to minimize the impact … Continue reading this entry

Patent Reform: The Leahy Patent Transparency And Improvements Act

Now that the Goodlatte Innovation Act has passed the House, its provisions likely will be reconciled with the Patent Transparency and Improvements Act (S. 1720) that was introduced in the Senate by Senator Leahy (D-Vt.) on November 18, 2013. While much attention will be paid to the patent litigation and post grant review provisions, the bill … Continue reading this entry

The Danger Of Double Patenting

In St. Jude Medical, Inc. v. Access Closure, Inc., the Federal Circuit found that one of St. Jude’s patents was invalid under the doctrine of obviousness-type double patenting. This case highlights the potential difficulty of maintaining consonance with an original restriction requirement in a multi-generational patent family.  … Continue reading this entry

Congressman Goodlatte Proposes To Codify Obviousness-Type Double Patenting

As I wrote previously, Congressman Goodlatte (R-Va.) released “a discussion draft” of patent reform legislation on May 23, 2013. Although the stated purpose of the draft legislation is to “address the ever increasing problem of abusive patent litigation,” it also includes other significant proposed changes, including provisions that would eliminate Section 145 actions and eliminate Exelixis … Continue reading this entry

Federal Circuit Finds Obviousness-Type Double Patenting Without Common Ownership

Obviousness-type double patenting usually arises between commonly-owned patents or patent applications. While the USPTO has interpreted the judicially-created doctrine as pertaining when there is common or overlapping inventorship, without regard to common ownership, the Federal Circuit had not upheld that interpretation of the doctrine until last week, in In re Hubbell.… Continue reading this entry

Federal Circuit Clarifies Obviousness-Type Double Patenting Between Products And Methods

In Eli Lilly and Company v. Teva Parenteral Medicines, Inc., the Federal Circuit affirmed the district court’s decision that Eli Lilly’s patent to pemetrexed is not invalid for obviousness-type double patenting. The Federal Circuit’s decision provides important guidance on one of the most complex areas of  U.S. patent jurisprudence, and explains how information in the specification … Continue reading this entry