Tag Archives: Method Claim

En Banc Federal Circuit Eases Requirements For Induced Infringement Of Method Claims

On August 31, 2012, the Federal Circuit issued an en banc, per curiam opinion deciding both Akamai Technologies, Inc. v. Limelight Networks, Inc. and McKesson Technologies, Inc. v. Epic Systems Corp., which each relate to the requirements for establishing infringement when all of the steps of a method claim are not performed by a single … Continue reading this entry

Puzzled By Prometheus

Last Wednesday I attended an excellent roundtable on Prometheus hosted by The George Washington University Law School and The Biotechnology Industry Organization (BIO). The roundtable was moderated by Hans Sauer of BIO and John M. Whealan of GW Law, and the panelists included The Honorable Paul R. Michel, intellectual property law professors, industry representatives, and practitioners (including my … Continue reading this entry

Federal Circuit Upholds Many Classen Method Claims, Also Limits Reach Of Safe Harbor

On August 31, 2011, the Federal Circuit issued its second decision in Classen Immunotherapies, Inc. v. Biogen Idec, which was on remand from the Supreme Court after Bilski v. Kappos. Judge Newman wrote the opinion for the court, which was joined by Chief Judge Rader, and holds that two of the three asserted patents recite … Continue reading this entry

Federal Circuit Issues Mixed Decision On Myriad Claims

On July 29, 2011, the Federal Circuit issued its decision in Association for Molecular Pathology v. USPTO, also known as the ACLU/Myriad “gene patenting” case. In a mixed decision, the court held that “isolated DNA” claims are patent-eligible under 35 USC § 101, but that the “comparing” or “analyzing” method claims are not. With a … Continue reading this entry

Who Will Infringe That Method Claim?

In Akamai Technologies, Inc. v. Limelight Networks, Inc., the Federal Circuit clarified the requirements for establishing joint infringement--a theory of direct infringement that may be used when a single party does not perform all of the steps of a method claim. The decision provides a good reminder to consider "who" is likely to perform each step of a method claim. This analysis can be particularly important in the context of diagnostic and personalized medicine methods. … Continue reading this entry