Tag Archives: Evidence

Federal Circuit Finds Flexibility In Admissibility Of Expert Testimony On Infringement

In MeadWestVaco Corp. v. Rexam Beauty and Closures, Inc., the Federal Circuit upheld the admissibility of expert testimony that was not fully aligned with the district court’s claim construction. In so doing, the court explained that deviations from the claim construction might impact the infringement determination, but did not render the evidence irrelevant as a … Continue reading this entry

Federal Circuit Vacates PTAB Decision Invalidating Rambus Patent

In Rambus, Inc. v. Rea, the Federal Circuit found several legal and procedural errors in the decision of the USPTO Patent Trial and Appeal Board (PTAB) that invalidated certain claims of the Rambus patent as obvious. While the technology at issue goes beyond the scope of PharmaPatentsBlog, the decision makes several important points of general … Continue reading this entry

Supreme Court Affirms Hyatt, Confirms Availability Of New Evidence, De Novo Review In Section 145 Actions

On April 18, 2012, the U.S. Supreme Court decided Kappos v. Hyatt, which raised questions regarding the ability to introduce new evidence and the applicable standard of review when a patent applicant challenges the USPTO’s refusal to grant a patent in a district court  proceeding under 35 USC § 145 (“Civil Action to Obtain a … Continue reading this entry

Supreme Court Hears Oral Arguments In Section 145 Case (Kappos v. Hyatt)

On January 9, 2012, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments in Kappos v. Hyatt. The issues before the Court relate to the scope of new evidence that a patent applicant can introduce against the USPTO in a district court action under 35 USC § 145 (“Civil Action to Obtain a Patent”) and the degree of … Continue reading this entry

Federal Circuit Permits Post-Filing Date Unexpected Results To Support Non-Obviousness

The Federal Circuit decision in Genetics Institute, LLC v. Novartis Vaccines & Diagnostics, Inc. is interesting in several respects. In this article, I look at the court’s decision to permit unexpected results discovered after the patent applications at issue were filed to support non-obviousness.… Continue reading this entry

Supreme Court Grants Certiorari in Hyatt v. Kappos Section 145 Case

On June 27, 2011, the Supreme Court granted certiorari in Hyatt v. Kappos. This means that the Court will review the en banc Federal Circuit decision which held that there are virtually no limits on the new evidence that a patent applicant can introduce in a district court action under 35 USC § 145 (“Civil Action to Obtain a Patent”). … Continue reading this entry

Federal Circuit Keeps Door Open for New Evidence in Section 145 Actions

On Monday, November 8, 2010, the Federal Circuit issued its decision in the en banc re-hearing of Hyatt v. Kappos. The en banc court departed from the August 11, 2009 panel decision, and held that there are virtually no limits on the new evidence that a patent applicant can introduce against the USPTO in a district court action … Continue reading this entry

Hyatt v. Kappos: Will a Bad Case Make Bad Law?

In an August 11, 2009 panel decision, the Federal Circuit limited the evidence that a patent applicant can introduce against the USPTO in a district court action under 35 USC § 145 (“Civil Action to Obtain a Patent”). The court subsequently agreed to rehear the case en banc, and oral arguments in the en banc … Continue reading this entry